Suicidal ideation concerns thoughts about or an unusual preoccupation with suicide. The range of suicidal ideation varies greatly from fleeting thoughts, to extensive thoughts, to detailed planning, role playing (e.g., standing on a chair with a noose), and unsuccessful attempts, which may be deliberately constructed to fail or be discovered, or may be fully intended to result in death, but the individual survives (e.g., for example in the case of a hanging in which the cord breaks). Most people who undergo suicidal ideation do not go on to make suicide attempts, but it is considered a risk factor. During 2008-09, an estimated 8.3 million adults aged 18 and over in the United States, or 3.7% of the adult U.S. population, reported having suicidal thoughts in the past year. An estimated 2.2 million U.S. reported having made suicide plans in the past year. Suicidal ideation is generally associated with depression; however, it seems to have associations with many other psychiatric disorders, life events, and family events, all of which may increase the risk of suicidal ideation. Recurrent suicidal behavior and suicidal ideation is a hallmark of borderline personality disorder. One study found that 73% of patients with borderline personality disorder have attempted suicide, with the average patient having 3.4 attempts. Currently, there are a number of different treatment options for those experiencing suicidal ideation.